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The Watch Appreciation Thread (Reviews and Photos of Men's Timepieces by Rolex, Patek Philippe, Brei

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by gdl203, May 20, 2007.

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  1. dddrees

    dddrees Well-Known Member

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    Here's what I've found so far:

    What's a Perpetual Calendar? How is it different from an Annual Calendar or Triple-Date?

    A perpetual calendar is the most developed form of the simple date window on a typical watch. It keeps track of date, day-of-the-week, (sometimes weeks), months, year, leap years, and sometimes even centuries. Because of the relatively complex rules governing the Gregorian calendar, including the varying lengths of months, and leap years every four years, a typical perpetual calendar has wheels turning from several times per second (e.g. balance wheel) all the way to once every four years. Because of the complexity of the Gregorian calendar, some perpetual calendars will require an experienced watchmaker open the watch to make an adjustment at AD 2100, or later (assuming that an experienced watchmaker still exists then).
    Some less complex calendars are also available:
    • Semi-perpetual calendars (e.g. the Breitling Montbrilliant 1461), which requires an adjustment on leap year day only.
    • annual calendars (of which the Patek Philippe 5035 is an outstanding example), which only require a user adjustment once every February
    • "triple date" calendars, which contain month, day, and date - but need to be manually advanced at the end of each (short) month
    Some would say that the inconvenience in resetting the date on a true perpetual calendar is the main reason for the existence of the watch winder industry. :)
     
    Last edited: Sep 7, 2012
  2. dddrees

    dddrees Well-Known Member

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    [​IMG]

    This is the one I'm wearing today.
     
  3. dddrees

    dddrees Well-Known Member

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    This is what I found on Wikipedia:

    The Gregorian calendar, also called the Western calendar and the Christian calendar, is the internationally accepted civil calendar.[1][2][3] It was introduced by Pope Gregory XIII, after whom the calendar was named, by a decree signed on 24 February 1582; the decree, a papal bull, is known by its opening words, Inter gravissimas.[4] The reformed calendar was adopted later that year by a handful of countries, with other countries adopting it over the following centuries.
    The motivation for the Gregorian reform was that the Julian calendar assumes that the time between vernal equinoxes is 365.25 days, when in fact it is presently almost exactly 11 minutes shorter. The discrepancy accumulates at the rate of about three days every four centuries, resulting in the equinox being on March 11 (a cumulative error of about 10 days since Roman times), and moving steadily earlier in the Julian calendar, at the time of the Gregorian reform. Because the spring equinox was tied to the celebration of Easter, the Roman Catholic Church considered this steady movement in the date of the equinox undesirable.
    The Gregorian calendar reform contained two parts: a reform of the Julian calendar as used prior to Pope Gregory's time and a reform of the lunar cycle used by the Church, with the Julian calendar, to calculate the date of Easter. The reform was a modification of a proposal made by the Calabrian doctor Aloysius Lilius (or Lilio).[5] Lilius' proposal included reducing the number of leap years in four centuries from 100 to 97, by making 3 out of 4 centurial years common instead of leap years: this part of the proposal had been suggested before by, among others, Pietro Pitati. Lilio also produced an original and practical scheme for adjusting the epacts of the moon when calculating the annual date of Easter, solving a long-standing obstacle to calendar reform.
    The Gregorian calendar thus modified the Julian calendar's regular cycle of leap years, years exactly divisible by four,[6] including all centurial years, as follows:
    Every year that is exactly divisible by four is a leap year, except for years that are exactly divisible by 100; the centurial years that are exactly divisible by 400 are still leap years. For example, the year 1900 is not a leap year; the year 2000 is a leap year.[7]
    In addition to the change in the mean length of the calendar year from 365.25 days (365 days 6 hours) to 365.2425 days (365 days 5 hours 49 minutes 12 seconds), a reduction of 10 minutes 48 seconds per year, the Gregorian calendar reform also dealt with the accumulated difference between these lengths. Between AD 325 (when the First Council of Nicaea was held, and the vernal equinox occurred approximately 21 March), and the time of Pope Gregory's bull in 1582, the vernal equinox had moved backward in the calendar, until it was occurring on about 11 March, 10 days earlier. The Gregorian calendar therefore began by skipping 10 calendar days, to restore March 21 as the date of the vernal equinox.
    Because of the Protestant Reformation, however, many Western European countries did not initially follow the Gregorian reform, and maintained their old-style systems. Eventually other countries followed the reform for the sake of consistency, but by the time the last adherents of the Julian calendar in Eastern Europe (Russia and Greece) changed to the Gregorian system in the 20th century, they had to drop 13 days from their calendars, due to the additional difference between the two calendars accumulated after 1582.
    The Gregorian calendar continued the previous year-numbering system (Anno Domini), which counts years from the traditional date of the nativity, originally calculated in the 6th century and in use in much of Europe by the High Middle Ages. This year-numbering system, now also called Common Era, is the predominant international standard today. [8]


    The Gregorian calendar is an arithmetical calendar potentially extending over an infinite time scale. It consists of a series of contiguous calendar years identified by consecutive year numbers.[9] It is a solar calendar and counts days as the basic unit of time, grouping them into years of 365 or 366 days; and repeats completely every 146,097 days, which fill 400 years, and which also happens to be 20,871 seven-day weeks.[10][11]
    Of these 400 years, 303 common years have 365 days and 97 leap years have 366 days. This yields a calendar mean year of exactly 365+97/400 days = 365.2425 days = 365 days, 5 hours, 49 minutes and 12 seconds. The same result is obtained by summing the fractional parts implied by the rule: 365 + 1⁄4 − 1⁄100 + 1⁄400 = 365 + 0.25 − 0.01 + 0.0025 = 365.2425
    A Gregorian year is divided into twelve months:



    Although the month length pattern seems irregular, it can be represented by the arithmetic expression L = 30 + { [ M + floor(M/8) ] MOD 2 }, where L is the month length in days and M is the month number 1 to 12. The expression is valid for all 12 months, but for M = 2 (February) adjust by subtracting 2 and then if it is a leap year add 1.
    For a better representation, consider Zeller's Congruence.
    A calendar date is fully specified by the year (numbered by some scheme beyond the scope of the calendar itself), the month (identified by name or number), and the day of the month (numbered sequentially starting at 1).
    Leap years add a 29th day to February, which normally has 28 days. The essential ongoing differentiating feature of the Gregorian calendar, as distinct from the Julian calendar with a leap day every four years, is that the Gregorian omits 3 leap days every 400 years. This difference would have been more noticeable in modern memory were it not that the year 2000 was a leap year in both the Julian and Gregorian calendar systems.
    The intercalary day in a leap year is known as a leap day. Since Roman times 24 February (bissextile) was counted as the leap day,[12][13] but now 29 February is regarded as the leap day in most countries.

    Although the calendar year runs from 1 January to 31 December, sometimes year numbers were based on a different starting point within the calendar. Confusingly, the term "Anno Domini" is not specific on this point, and actually refers to a family of year numbering systems with different starting points for the years.
     
  4. in stitches

    in stitches Well-Known Member

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    ddd, nice job on explaining the complexity of the perp cal, also, nice patek. how big is your collection?
     
  5. dddrees

    dddrees Well-Known Member

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    Thanks, but I just copied some info from a couple of different soures.

    Not that large, just a few nice watches that I really really like.
     
  6. Hayward

    Hayward Well-Known Member

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    Nice watch. Thought about getting one of these for a while now but I already have multiple mil-style watches. Will have to liquidate more of them first.

    We may need to start a Middle Class Watch Porn thread.

    As for your date laziness - watchwinders were made for folks like you.
     
    Last edited: Sep 7, 2012
  7. in stitches

    in stitches Well-Known Member

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    yes, but the info was good. that is what counts after all right?

    they are all quite nice that i have seen. enjoy!
     
  8. in stitches

    in stitches Well-Known Member

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    Boss letting me wear this for the day

    [​IMG]

    Srs question, we are looking to sell this. As we have never had this particular model before, anyone have any idea what we should hold out for, for it, on the pre owned market?
     
  9. gdl203

    gdl203 Well-Known Member

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    eww... I upchucked a little
     
  10. dddrees

    dddrees Well-Known Member

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    Very nice, unfortunately I'm not sure what they are going for on the pre-owned market.

    However one day I wouldn't mind getting aa SS version of this one day.
     
    Last edited: Sep 7, 2012
  11. in stitches

    in stitches Well-Known Member

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    lolz, i would never buy it, but i wanted to wear it for a day. next week i wear the patek.


    thanks, yeah, SS would look better, or the gold on a brown band.
     
  12. Dino944

    Dino944 Well-Known Member

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    Nice watch, wrong metal. It definitely, looks much better in steel. When new, in gold they had a pretty steep price tag, but VC's from the early 2000's were heavily discounted, and hopefully you guys didn't pay a lot for this one. That bracelet design is also known for links getting "locked up" or stuck. The few auction results I saw were several years old for an all gold NON-chrongraph version for suggested estimates of $8,000 to $11,000...with actual sales prices being $8,280, $10,580 including the buyers premium, and then the one gold CHRONGRAPH version had estimates of $10,000-12,000 and actually sold for $11,500 including the buyers premium. Again results are several years old, but most people favor this watch in all steel, so in gold it might be a tough sale.
     
  13. MuZI

    MuZI Active Member

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    I have a couple of watches. The amount I would spend on a nice watch winder... I'd rather just buy another watch.

    Tudor Chronograph for today.

    [​IMG]
     
  14. in stitches

    in stitches Well-Known Member

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    thanks! we paid less than the scrap value, so we are fine either way. we have an offer over 20K, just wondering if we could get more, i guess we should take the offer. :)
     
  15. atila

    atila Well-Known Member

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    I've bought MANY watches for "less than scrap gold value" but its always old geneve watches that we literally scrap and melt down. Never been offered one like this - actually, we bought a 18kt TT Ladies Yachtmaster for $800, mom still wears it today.

    Amazed someone would sell that watch for scrap gold price, wow, you better jump on any offer over $10k considering you paid maybe a 20% of that!
     
  16. in stitches

    in stitches Well-Known Member

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    it was an unusually good buy. :D

    nice job with the watch for your mom!
     
    Last edited: Sep 7, 2012
  17. Dino944

    Dino944 Well-Known Member

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    I'm a VC fan (I own 2 Vacherons), but personally I think its a rather undesirable version of the Overseas. So if you have an offer of better than 20K, I would be afraid not to take the offer. If your buyer dies, you guys might never see an offer like that again and you could be sitting on it for a very long time!
     
  18. in stitches

    in stitches Well-Known Member

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    Yah, thats what i figured, just doin mah due dilegence.

    Thanks all for your help.
     
  19. drizzt3117

    drizzt3117 Well-Known Member

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    Picked up my ROO diver today (on offshore bracelet). pics to come!
     
  20. Newcomer

    Newcomer Well-Known Member

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    :lurk:
     
    Last edited: Sep 7, 2012
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