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Shoe Damage Report & Shoe P0rn Central - Part II

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Oyaji, Feb 20, 2010.

  1. isshinryu101

    isshinryu101 Well-Known Member

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    No, not really made to be worn. However, that doesn't mean you couldn't wear them.

    The point is to show that:

    1) While there are still some "shoe artisans" around now who have the ability to do work like this (and the 64 stitches per inch DWFII wrote about), they are very few. Obviously machines and big business made it no longer cost effective for most to spend a lifetime in the trade of hand-shoe making. The pool of people learning the trade is very small now, so the best of that group would be hard-pressed to compete skillwise with the best from the 1920's in the U.S. where literally hundreds of companies and thousands of shoemakers were doing handmade shoes.

    2) While US shoemaking is pretty much dead today (with a few exceptions, of course), the best of the US makers in years past was easily on par (or maybe even surpassing) the best from Europe.
     
  2. ljrcustom

    ljrcustom Well-Known Member

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    Which if any of the US Makers are still around? Thanks.

    -LR
     
  3. isshinryu101

    isshinryu101 Well-Known Member

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    Alden & AE use machines for welting. DFWII still does handmades...
     
  4. The Shoe Snob

    The Shoe Snob Well-Known Member

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  5. jerrybrowne

    jerrybrowne Well-Known Member

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    WOAH. Where do you find this stuff?! Amazing.
     
  6. isshinryu101

    isshinryu101 Well-Known Member

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    OCD can be your Friend!

    Glad you enjoy them.
     
  7. chogall

    chogall Well-Known Member

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    Isshinryu, those two pairs of shoes are pure decorative pieces of art!
     
  8. HORNS

    HORNS Well-Known Member

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    HaHaHa!!!
     
  9. HORNS

    HORNS Well-Known Member

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    Nice shoes. I mean, the medallion is FREAKING HUGE but otherwise a good looking shoe.
     
  10. SpooPoker

    SpooPoker Internet Bigtimer and Most Popular Man on Campus

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    Ish, those are beautiful. Any story on them particularly? I would love to get them over to the blogosphere.
     
  11. Mr. Moo

    Mr. Moo Well-Known Member

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    Wow, Ish, those are nuts.
     
  12. kolecho

    kolecho Well-Known Member

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    DWFII has written about "Shoemaking Competitions" that took place long ago in the U.S. I believe he mentioned the "Holy Grail" of stitching being in the neighborhood of 64 per inch. Not necessarily wearable, but definitely showcases the maker's skills. Here are 2 entries from a similar competition that took place in the U.S. in the 1920's. Rather than shoe construction, the focus here was coming up with the most beautiful Re-Sole possible. First the shoe, then the soles. WOW!

    [​IMG]

    Brass nail heel pattern? Hope the wearer has a padded ass.
     
  13. DWFII

    DWFII Well-Known Member

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    Appears to be about an inch and a quarter military or "Cuban" heel with a scalloped breast. I don't think I've ever seen a scallop breast before...I kind of like it.
     
  14. Mr. Moo

    Mr. Moo Well-Known Member

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    DW, in your opinion how hard is it to do all of that sole work vs. what we typically see here (fiddleback waist, etc.)?
     
  15. The Shoe Snob

    The Shoe Snob Well-Known Member

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    You are right, it is a bit big, but thanks nonetheless!
     
  16. culverwood

    culverwood Well-Known Member

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    Handmade

    Of the shoes on yesterdays blog post the one I find most attractive is the second last the brown cap toe.
     
  17. DWFII

    DWFII Well-Known Member

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    Hey, I don't know. As I implied in my previous posts, I don't even know what they were using for "pins" nor where to get something that would be a reasonable facsimile.

    I just yesterday placed a small order for some small brass pins used in caning but haven't received them yet. Will they work? I don't know but I'm gonna find out. Maybe then I'll be better positioned to say how difficult this work is.

    That said, in my admittedly, speculative opinion, I think the hard part is finding the right (or suitable) materials. Then the next hard part will be spacing the pins both closely and evenly. After that, I suspect it's mostly just work.

    Doing a fiddleback beveled waist isn't all that hard at its most basic, either. It's all about controlling angles and shape and then the final finishing.

    BTW, I suspect, as Isshin said, that pinwork wasn't done with an expectation of actual wear.

    Having said that, if the pins are short enough that they do not stiffen the outsole of the shoe (as well as the shoe itself), there is no reason one couldn't wear shoes that had been pinned. They might function like toe plates or sole protectors.
     
    Last edited: Feb 3, 2012
  18. goodlensboy

    goodlensboy Well-Known Member

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    Issh - I must thank you for your this post

    Do these shoes really got around 60 stitches per inch!!! ?
     
  19. HORNS

    HORNS Well-Known Member

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    I suspect that if those pins are short enough to not poke through the sole then the ones that are at the part of the sole that bends have a good chance of falling out.
     
  20. DWFII

    DWFII Well-Known Member

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    Hmmm. You may be correct although just walking might tend to compress the leather around the pins as well as drive each of them a little deeper. I am trying to envision when during the gait the pins would have an opportunity to fall out.

    But, that said,since the pins are harder than the surrounding leather, if they are too long they will just be driven deeper into the insole and eventually into the foot. Sydney Brinkerhof details this in Boots and Shoes of the Frontier Soldier 1865-1893 recounting the problems soldiers in the American West experienced with boots that had brass "screws" (really just nails) in lieu of wooden pegs.

    There may be no one alive who has owned or worn shoes with decorative brass pins to tell us what to expect.

    What I have ordered is quarter inch and three-eighths inch. If they have a substantial head which must be clipped off the quarter inch pins might very well be too short .
     
    Last edited: Feb 3, 2012

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