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Bespoke suits out of college

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by nelly, Aug 27, 2006.

  1. nelly

    nelly Well-Known Member

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    Hi everyone, I'll be graduating college soon in the future. I was just wondering whether it's worth it to get MTM or bespoke suits from places like brioni or kiton right out of college. I'm guessing i'd be a lowly cubicle worker for the first couple of years.
     
  2. EL72

    EL72 Well-Known Member

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    Sure, if you have at least $5k per suit to spend then go for it!
     
  3. edmorel

    edmorel Well-Known Member

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    It seems that you are underestimating the cost of the suits and overestimating your earnings power fresh out of college.
     
  4. nelly

    nelly Well-Known Member

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    I'm not underestimating, I know how much they cost.

    Cost aside, I'm just wondering that relative to when I would be wearing them (in a cubicle going at it with Microsoft Excel) whether it's worth it. Say as a lowly investment banking analyst, you probably wouldn't see the light of day. And at that point, would it be better to just buy crap that will just throw away after two years instead of going high end right away.
     
  5. edmorel

    edmorel Well-Known Member

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    My advice would be to set a budget, and them find the best quality you can get at your budget level. If you wear suits everyday, you'll need at least 5 so as to not run them down right away. There definitely won't be many, if any, first year analysts in any business donning Kiton, more like Brooks Brothers, but if $20,000-25,000 isn't an issue for you, then get 5-6 classic (navy and charcoal, 2 or 3 button, side vents and no wacky patterns) Kiton ot Brioni suits and they'll serve you well for many years as you climb the corporate ladder and they'll always be in style. Ideally, you'll need to add suits to your wardrobe so that you wear a suit once every two weeks at worst (10 suits). You can go cheaper and still get quality suits and have money left over for other stuff like food, but it sounds like you're a big hitter.
     
  6. JLibourel

    JLibourel Well-Known Member

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    I would also mention, depending on how old you actually are, that it might be prudent to wait a few years until your body size and type stabilize before blowing a large amount on bespoke attire. I am assuming that you are somewhere in your early-to-mid 20s. Usually a young fellow that age has some further filling out to do. Whether this is for good or ill will depend a lot on your lifestyle choices--diet, exercise, etc.
     
  7. nelly

    nelly Well-Known Member

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    I think going with your suggestion of a descent suit like BrooksBrothers the first few years is probably best. Eventually I'll try to upgrade. Thanks
     
  8. kronik

    kronik Well-Known Member

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    I would also mention, depending on how old you actually are, that it might be prudent to wait a few years until your body size and type stabilize before blowing a large amount on bespoke attire. I am assuming that you are somewhere in your early-to-mid 20s. Usually a young fellow that age has some further filling out to do. Whether this is for good or ill will depend a lot on your lifestyle choices--diet, exercise, etc.
    Seconded. Purchasing a bespoke suit can be a lifetime (of wearing a suit to work) investment. Buying one or five, for that matter, straight of college probably wouldn't be ideal unless you were absolutely confident that your body shape wasn't going to change for the next 20 years. Highly unlikely. Stick to the lower-priced quality suits before you start going for the bespoke high-end, jm2c.
     
  9. Kent Wang

    Kent Wang Well-Known Member

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    You can also get a suit from Chan for $1k or so. I got one straight out of college when I was 21. Time will tell whether that was a smart move or not.
     
  10. mrchapel

    mrchapel Well-Known Member

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    Personally, if I had the money to go bespoke, I would go to Henry Poole and Co. located on Savile Row in London. But that's me. If you have the money, I'd go for it. Anything you get bespoke or MTM is going to look significantly better than anything you could find OTR.
     
  11. edmorel

    edmorel Well-Known Member

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    Personally, if I had the money to go bespoke, I would go to Henry Poole and Co. located on Savile Row in London. But that's me. If you have the money, I'd go for it. Anything you get bespoke or MTM is going to look significantly better than anything you could find OTR.

    Interestinly enough, the current Men's Vogue has a family of men (a father and two sons) who are in business together and who all wear Poole, the dad for many years. You can't see a full view of the Dad, but the sons look medicore at best given that the suits are Poole. One son looks like he is wearing a Brooks sack suit and the other has pants that are about 2 inches too long. Neither one would stand out as very well dressed.
     
  12. LabelKing

    LabelKing Well-Known Member

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    I'm not particulary keen on Poole or Anderson & Sheppard, and others who tend to a less structured British cut.

    In fact, the drape cut tends to look mediocre in most cases, while a military type coat almost always looks elegant.
     
  13. kitonbrioni

    kitonbrioni Well-Known Member

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    Brioni and Kiton are what you are wanting, then by all means go with them.
     
  14. acidboy

    acidboy Well-Known Member

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    if you can afford it, or somebody's financing your purchase, then i do not see why not.
     
  15. JLibourel

    JLibourel Well-Known Member

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    You can also get a suit from Chan for $1k or so. I got one straight out of college when I was 21. Time will tell whether that was a smart move or not.

    I am another very satisfied customer of W.W. Chan. If you fancy bespoke, Chan is a very good waystation between Brooks or quality department store suits and full top-dollar bespoke. In fact, you may find that Chan is such an excellent value, you don't need to go any further.
     
  16. Matt

    Matt Well-Known Member

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    Brioni and Kiton are what you are wanting, then by all means go with them.
    kitonbrioni do you like brioni and kiton? [​IMG]
     
  17. DGP

    DGP Well-Known Member

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    KB- I think your handle leaves no mystery as to your tastes, however I would say that for a younger guy, regardless of means, Zegna is a better MTM maker than Bespoke/MTM Kiton or Brioni. Their cuts are a bit younger, and, though their construction/detailing may not be quite as exquisit as that of the former makers, the cloth is amazing, and they will run you half the price.
     
  18. william

    william Well-Known Member

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    Interestinly enough, the current Men's Vogue has a family of men (a father and two sons) who are in business together and who all wear Poole, the dad for many years. You can't see a full view of the Dad, but the sons look medicore at best given that the suits are Poole. One son looks like he is wearing a Brooks sack suit and the other has pants that are about 2 inches too long. Neither one would stand out as very well dressed.

    I just read that article yesterday at Borders. I kept studying that picture as if I was missing something. They looked average at best.
     
  19. pejsek

    pejsek Well-Known Member

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    Personally, if I had the money to go bespoke, I would go to Henry Poole and Co. located on Savile Row in London. But that's me. If you have the money, I'd go for it. Anything you get bespoke or MTM is going to look significantly better than anything you could find OTR.

    I don't mean to be strident, but this is ridiculous. Bespoke is not a magic incantation (okay, well maybe it is but only in a far more roundabout way). For those without unusual fit issues, high quality rtw nearly always delivers greater style than entry level bespoke. I've seen some truly wonderful things from Henry Poole, yet I've also seen some authentic mediocrities from that very same legend of tailoring. More than anything else, bespoke is the product of a relation between tailor and client. It would be surprising if things were to work out perfectly from the beginning (not that it doesn't happen from time to time). And that's just the conversation part. From the business angle, if you are going to get serious attention and the services of the best cutters, sewers, etc. the tailor must be convinced that you are in this for the long haul, that they can count on you to order several things from them every year for many years to come. It's not as simple as just going in, getting measured up, and then coming back for a couple of fittings. Over time you will come to know what you want and you will have a relationship with the tailor that can translate that into clothing. JLibourel appears to have done this with Chan. That's the magic part. But short of that, high quality rtw will give you harmonious styling and construction that you will be free to judge and take or leave as you wish. It's a far less costly and risky proposition (especially when you may not be sure about what features you want and how those may fit together).
     
  20. epa

    epa Well-Known Member

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    I am not sure that very expensive clothes are the right thing for somebody starting a professional career. Won't it look like your dad paid for it? Isn't there a risk that your colleagues may look at you as some kind of "daddy's spoiled son"?
    I think that it can, at least sometimes, be better to start with clothes in a price class in line with the salary. Also, this means that while your career is progressing, you will be able to gratify yourself by buying better and better clothes. If you start with the best right from the beginning, you will not have the pleasure of feeling that your first Brioni is the fruit of hard and successful work.
     

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